Monday, September 14, 2020

Schedule & Agendas

8:00 am - 9:15 am

OPENING SESSION

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Kyle Plush, a vibrant 16-year-old high school sophomore, died from asphyxiation while trapped in his family van on April 10, 2018. Kyle did all he could during that time to save his life. His arms were pinned when the rear seat in his van flipped. Twice he called Cincinnati’s communications center   9-1-1 through voice-activated SIRI on his iPhone. SIRI was the only way Kyle could make a call since he could not reach his cell phone in his pants pocket. During these two 9-1-1 calls, he gave his name, location in the Seven Hills School parking lot, the model and color of the van he was in, and urgent pleas for help because he knew he was dying.

Unfortunately, those desperate calls did not prevent Kyle’s death. The 9-1-1 dispatchers and police did not locate him, and his father found him hours after he died—nearly 6 hours after Kyle’s first 9-1-1 call.

Join Jill Plush, mother of Kyle Plush, to hear Kyle’s story, discuss lessons learned from the incident, technology improvements in public safety, and how to be your best every day.

9:30 am - 10:30 am

FRONT LINE PROFESSIONAL

EVERYONE COMMUNICATES 911 NEEDS TO CONNECT

Joe McCarville, 911 Gold Line Training

Participants will learn all about communication and the importance of connecting with those we dispatch for as well as the people we speak to on the phone.

Participants will learn the components to communication, communication barriers as well as the 3 effective principles to communication

10:45 am - 11:45 am

LEADERSHIP and MANAGEMENT

IS IT POSSIBLE TO PREPARE YOUR TEAM FOR THE (UN)EXPECTED?

Maureen Dieckmann, Moetivations​

TITWWHADI Disease! This is the way we have always done it! Why change? Preparing your PSAP teams for the (un)expected in a world where technology, staffing, and community are forcing us to do it differently is a MUST! Not only learning policy and tactical training, you must learn also, the human side of change: messaging, communicating, and retaliation! (To name just a few obstacles).

Three learning objectives:

  •  Master the human side of PSAP changes: Inspire, improve, and align your people for what is coming.

  • Learn to assess Quality of Service impact; which helps you get prepared for long term adoption of any change.

  • Find Your Change Agents: Encourage individual willingness and support adjustments.

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

IF THEY ARE THE PROBLEM, WHY DO I HAVE TO CHANGE?  part 1

Tracy Eldridge, On Scene First

“He makes me so mad!” “She made me feel horrible!” Have you ever said something like this, have you ever placed blame on others for the way someone made you feel? If so, you are not alone, but did you know the person responsible for how you feel is you? In this session, we will learn how to better manage emotions, how to deal with various personality types, especially the difficult ones, and how to become aware of the limitations of expectations. By incorporating these strategies those in the ECC will be able to reduce stress and strengthen professional relationships.  TO BE CONTINUED ON TUESDAY

Lessons to be learned/Goal Statement:

Students will learn how to identify not only their personalities but the personalities of their co-workers.

In addition, they will learn the needs/wants, motivating/demotivating behaviors for each personality type.

They will also learn the importance of being a leader regardless of their role in the 9-1-1 center.

Finally, they will learn how to change the behavior they are demonstrating that is causing them difficulties with certain people and in turn, they will be able to build better relationships

2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

TRANSPARENCY IN GOVERNMENT: THE TENNESSEE PUBLIC RECORDS and TENNESSEE OPEN MEETINGS ACT

Lee Pope, Open Records Counsel;  Office of Open Records Counsel, Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury

The presentation provides an overview of Tennessee's public records and open meetings laws. It covers the requirements of the laws and specific issues governmental entities commonly encounter when receiving and responding to public record requests and conducting public meetings.

Those attending the presentation will learn the following:

The history of public records and open meetings in Tennessee;

Why we have the Office of Open Records Counsel and how it can be a resource for 911 districts;

The specific provisions of the Public Records Act applicable to governmental entities;

How to properly handle to public record requests;

How to charge for providing copies of public records;

Specific exceptions to the Public Records Act applicable to 911 districts;

When the Open Meetings Act applies;

The requirements of the Open Meetings Act;

How to remain compliant with the Open Meetings Act.

3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

TECHNOLOGY

OVERCOMING TODAY'S TOP 911 CHALLENGES

Martyn Gallus, Owner and President, Applied Digital Solutions

As a 911 center leader, you have one of the toughest jobs on the planet. Problems can come at you from every direction: funding, staffing, inconsistent performance, technology, community pressures. Furthermore, running a fine-tuned 911 center can be really hard when you don’t even have timely metrics to tell you where you stand today. In this educational session, we’ll provide advice and insights to help you get ahead of these challenges before they get ahead of you.

Participants will learn how to:

  • Streamline funding analysis and decisions by demonstrating the real impacts of your 911 center on your community;

  • Know when telecommunicators are struggling, and why, so you can better help them achieve success;

  • Get real-time insight into how your center is performing, every minute of every hour of every day;

  • Get to the root causes of staffing issues and stem turnover in your 911 center;

  • Prevent lapses in quality assurance and strive to execute perfectly on every 911 interaction;

  • See how new, disruptive technologies are impacting the incident lifecycle, your telecommunicators and your 911 center, and adapt accordingly.

© 2020 by Tennessee Emergency Number Association  All Rights Reserved